About your Search

20110901
20110930
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11
by the university of illinois. >> up next from c-span's "washington journal," indiana governor mitch daniels presents his thoughts on the current political and economic landscape. governor daniels recounts his handling of indiana's former deficit. his promotion of private sector employment and his argument for fiscal restraint. this is about 50 minutes. >> and here is the cover of governor mitch daniels upcoming book. it publishes in a month or so. he is the governor of indiana. the title, "keeping the republic" saving america by trusting americans. governor daniels now joins us in indianapolis to take your callsr governor daniels, as former, somebody who has worked here ins washington and spent eight years in indiana, how would you describe federal government and states, economically? guest: i think in most states we are headed in completely different directions. we have been asking the question what can state governments do or do better or do faster or maybe stop doing to make it more likely that the next job, the next investment -- the federal government for the last two years gets up and
your calls. governor daniels, you spent eight years in indiana. how would you describe the relationship between the federal government and states, economically? guest: i think in most states we are headed in completely different directions. we have been asking the question what can state governments do or do better or do faster or maybe stop doing to make it more likely that the next job, the next investment -- the federal government for the last two years gets up and thinks what we do to put another barrier, another regulation, another uncertainty, another tax on the people who would like to hire people and grow this economy? we states balance our budgets no matter what and take care of our food usual duties -- financial duties. host: today, our system of governance is being challenged by china and other authoritarian cultures that have generated faster economic growth in anything we have seen capable of. ho why did you write that? guest: i think it is a statement of fact. it has been written widely and said by the leaders of these countries. the only way to have a system that lists hu
are also at risk in these struggles in band, ohio, indiana and states like new jersey, where brother csonka comes out of the private sector in new jersey is here tonight in the cwa vice president had a huge rally in schaake and were confronted with chris christie. i don't know if you saw his mug on the cover of "the sunday times" magazine a week or two ago. the guy has a voracious appetite for a number of rings. contract concessions are among them. in new jersey not these other states on the cwa, ast, uaw all following the lead of seiu have organized in toto five, 600,000 home-based workers, home health areas, home day care providers in the last 10 years, biggest source of new union membership and has gained a very precarious foothold in the public sector for these workers who work in nontraditional work places, predominately female, nonwhite, often immigrant workers. many in the case of our joint bargaining unit, child care providers in new jersey would ask me, still trapped in the workfare. women are in the temporary assistance. so lost in this debate, if you can call it that in some medi
-organized union members who are also at risk in these struggles in wisconsin, in ohio, in indiana and states like new jersey where our cwa friends, brother brook comes out of new jersey, is here tonight and cwa vice president, had a huge rally up in trenton confront with the that charming fellow, chris christie. i don't know if you saw his mug on the cover of the sunday times a week or two. the guy has a voracious appetite, clearly, for a number of things. contracted sections are among them. but in new jersey and all these other states cwa, afsme, the uft all following the lead of seiu have organized in total five, 600,000 home health workers, home daycare providers. in the last ten years, biggest source of new dwhriewn onmembership -- union membership and have gained a precarious foothold in the public sector for these workers who work in nontraditional workplaces, predominantly female, nonwhite, often immigrant workers. many, as in the case of our joint bargaining unit child care providers in new jersey with afsme still trapped in the post-clinton world of work. there are women on temporary ass
sucking up when i say that. i like to think of myself as the indiana jones of libraries on the do the decimal system looking for interesting books. the duodecimal system created by the way by melville dewey, who was a rabid anti-semite. in fact i love it so much that give me a choice between a night with cade blanch at or a night locked away in the library of congress and i would take the night with blanchett in a heartbeat but i do love libraries. [laughter] i do love libraries. i thought i would talk a little bit about this book of mine, in the garden of beasts, and what came about. i'm a little alarmed that within the publishing company, crounse, a publishing company, within the company people -- i guess they are inherently lazy. they call the book almost now exclusively by its acronym which is itbog which sounds a little bit to me like something a cat coughed up. i realize if you say itgob you sound just like the girl possessed in the exorcist. [laughter] at first glance this may not seem like my kind of book necessarily. here it is. this book is set in 1933, 34 in nazi german
, not the former senator from indiana, but someone who really could stand up to him. of course rumsfeld and cheney could stand up to him, and they did. largely marginalized on any issue that he previously from his military experience would have been caught up in. understand, the law ever since 1947, creating the job of secdef, says it has to be from civilian life, and that means you can't have served in active duty within the past ten years. an exception was made. a law was passed so that general marshall could serve, but it takes another act of congress to waive that requirement. paul would not have been in the running anyway, just because of that legal technicality. >> assuming there is pork and waste in the defense budget, building major weapon systems we don't need it or that don't work, have there been the defense been any secretaries of defense with the courage to abolish what the systems? >> well, yes, there have been secretaries to have canceled different programs at different times. i think it is interesting that virtually every recent republican secretary of defense picked one just to pr
and indiana and virginia, they go out and they fight this good fight and to the best they can. as far as nobility, sure, i think that is one reason we don't have a famous great attorney like clarence darrow any more. you tend to get wealthy and as a trial lawyer when you win your first big case, and maybe tara would have ended up this way too but you don't end up representing the attorney for the. maybe was the fact dodaro fell so far in los angeles and had to come back that led them to take a series of cases and is 50s and 60s that we remember him by. i think success store -- spoils great lawyers. >> my name is matt harrington. i think the innocence project is someone representing oj and the work he does in capital defense who is living up to that high standard. i was just going to say i would -- i'm a lawyer and two books one was irving stone's book and very much styles himself as darrow successor. in dealing with darrow as there is this aching desire i have always had to find some place where he feels bad about driving those jurors. [laughter] and i'm wondering if anywhere in that
governor from new jersey, lee hamilton, former democratic congressman from indiana. they were co-chairs of the 9/11 commission. gentlemen, welcome. >> guest: thank you. >> host: my first question is a very simple one, why the book and why now. and i ask the question because two years ago the 9/11 commission report came out. it was a gripping account of what had happened with the whole 9/11 phenomenon, a roaring bestseller as i remember. now you have this book which i found very interesting, clearly written, candid and, i think, important. but i didn't find anything brand new about the 9/11 phenomenon, the attack on the united states. so i'm kind of wondering what is it, therefore, that you felt was so necessary to produce "without precedent," we'll start with the governor. >> guest: for one thing, other people are starting to write about us. [laughter] characterize us, so when that start toss happen, it's going to depend on who's going to write the account. that was one reason. another reason, frankly, is because we thought it was interesting. we went through experiences probably
that. i like to think of myself as the indiana jeans of jones of libraries repelling down the 900 levels of dewey desmat system looking for a book. the dewey decimal system created by melville dewey who was rabid anti-semite. i love libraries, if you were to give me a choice between a night with cate blanchett or a night locked alone in the library of congress, i would take the night with cate blanchett in a heartbeat but, but, i do love libraries. i do love libraries. i thought i would talk about this new book of mine, "in the garden of beasts" and how it came about. i'm alarmed within my publishing company, crown publishinging within the company they're inherently lazy, they call the book almost exclusively by its acronym, itgob. which sounds like something a cat coughed up. if you say itgob while growling you sound just like the possessed girl in the exorcist. take that home with you, you know? [laughter] at first glance this may not seem like my kind of book necessarily. here it is. this book is set in 1933-34 in nazi germany. hitler, the whole deal. here's the thing, this is
waters recently made a comment up in detroit, and representative andre carson, democrat of indiana, of indianapolis made this comment recently. i want to get your reaction. >> we have seen change in congress. the tea party itself has changed. this is beyond symbolic change. this is the effort that we are seeing of jim crow. >> host: ellis cose? traneighty we are looking at political rhetoric here, and political rhetoric seems to be extreme. i don't think that certainly in terms of the articulated public positions you're going to fight any tea party leadership saying we want second class citizens, or that we want people in sticking. that's jus just a part of the rhetoric. and i think many of them are sincere about that. they recognize that this is a different america, that you can't take america back to the 1940s, to the 1950s. but at the same time i think what they are expressing is they are frustrated. they're not quite sure where they fit in. they are not quite sure where things are going. and they are angry. but now i don't think they'll organize themselves into lynch mobs. >> h
's indiana, please go ahead. >> caller: thank you for your wonderful book. i was thinking of the relationship of ellen's three daughters. i read some of the first lady display that the figure of the second mrs. wilson wasn't worthy to be displayed next to the figure of her mother, ellen wilson. could you comment, please? >> yes. i don't know about that comment. i've never run across it so i don't know which daughter it was. edith had a somewhat contentious relationship with the youngest daughter from time to time. although at the end of her life they made up and were very cozy with each other. but ellen wilson had not wanted an inaugural ball. she didn't approve. she was a very sober, intellectual woman. she thought it was extravagant to have an inaugural ball. she thought it demedian the presidency to have a commercial event around it. so i don't think she had an inaugural gown. so she may have said that it was more important for her mother's gown to be there than edith's but i don't know which gown they would have used, frankly. >> when did edith wilson die? >> edith wilson died in 1961. sh
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)